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Woody > Abies > Abies squamata > Abies squamata

Abies squamata


Scaley Fir




Origin:  China - Gansu.
            Mike's Opinion

this is Mike

"

Abies squamata is an upright conifer with dark blue-green needles and a silvery underside. It's a great evergreen tree for house hold landscapes; it can with stand very low tempatures and is low maintenance.



Michael Pascoe, NDP., ODH., CLT., MSc. (Plant Conservation)

"

Family
Pinaceae
Genus
Abies
Species
squamata
Category
Woody
Type
Tree (evergreen)
Pronunciation
USDA Hardiness Zone
6a–6b
Canadian Hardiness Zone
7a–7b
Temperature (°C)
-23-(-20)
Temperature (°F)
-10-(-5)
Height
12 m
Spread
4.5–6 m
Photographs
Description and Growing Information
Flowering Period
General Description
Abies squamata is an upright conifer with dark blue-green needles with silvery undersides. Brown exfoliating bark gives winter interest. Prefers full sun in well-drained soil.
Cultivation
Abies squamata prefers moist but not water-logged soil; grows well in heavy clay soils. Abies squamata is very shade tolerant, especially when young, but growth is slower in shade.
Shape
Rounded shape evergreen tree.
Growth
Slow
ID Characteristic
Abies squamata has coniferous-like leaves and brown exfoliating bark. The fruits are cones.
Pests
Leaf Miner that tunnel between upper and lower leaf surfaces. A female adult can lay several hundred eggs inside the leaf.
Habitat
Forests in very dry regions of China.
Bark/Stem Description
Reddish-brown exfoliating bark which offers winter interest.
Leaf Description
Abies squamata has coniferous leaves with a cushion-like base. The leaves are arranged opposite from one another. 1.5–2.5 cm long needles.
Flower Description
The flowers are monoecious and are pollinated by wind.
Fruit Description
The fruits are 5–6 cm long ovate cones.
Colour Description
Dark blue-green needles with silvery undersides. Brown exfoliating bark.
Texture Description
Exfoliating bark.
Propagation
Seed propagation in early February in greenhouses; germination is usually poor, taking about 6 - 8 weeks.
References
F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992.
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