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Perennials, Tropicals > Gunnera > Gunnera manicata > Gunnera manicata

Gunnera manicata


Giant Rhubarb, Gunnera




Origin:  Native to Brazil and Columbia.
            Mike's Opinion

this is Mike

"

I wish I was in a warmer climate where I could grow this plant. As I child growing up in Cornwall, England, this plant was common in the large estate gardens but to a child's eye was not appreciated horticulturally; although because of its immense stature it was fun to play amongst. A South American native it requires lots of moisture and is often found growing in boggy situations. Those on the west coast can enjoy this plant although late frosts may be a concern for them and thus often some form of protection may still be required. I have tried to grow it as a potted plant but the results were always rather pathetic.



Michael Pascoe, NDP., ODH., CLT., MSc. (Plant Conservation)

"

Family
Gunneraceae
Genus
Gunnera
Species
manicata
Category
Perennials, Tropicals
USDA Hardiness Zone
7-10
Canadian Hardiness Zone
8
RHS Hardiness Zone
H2-H6
Temperature (°C)
-17.8-4.4
Temperature (°F)
0-40
Height
2-3 m
Spread
2.5-4 m
Photographs
Description and Growing Information
Flowering Period
JuneJuly
Cultivation
Best grown in rich, consistently moist soils and part shade.
Shape
Spreading and clumping habit.
Growth
Fast
Habitat
Found in areas with consistently moist soils; along the banks of lakes, rivers and streams.
Leaf Description
The large, green leaves are 2-3 m long, with toothed palmate margins and prominent veins. The leaves have small, prickly red hairs.
Flower Description
Small, reddish green flowers.
Fruit Description
The berry-like fruit is small and red.
Notable Specimens
Glendurgan Gardens, Falmouth, Cornwall, United Kingdom. Trebah Garden Trust, Mawnan Smith, Falmouth, Cornwall, United Kingdom. National Trust Trelissick Garden, Feock, near Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom.
Propagation
Propagated from seed. Germination is slow and requires protection from frost.
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