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Woody > Thuja > Thuja occidentalis > Thuja occidentalis 'Golden Globe'

Thuja occidentalis

'Golden Globe'


Golden Globe White Cedar




            Mike's Opinion

this is Mike

"

A very outstanding dwarf evergreen due to its year round colour interest, dense form and interesting bark. The ‘Golden Globe’ cultivar also can be maintained quite easily and looks great when used an accent plant in a home garden or as a specimen plant. This plant foliage may cause slight alllergy irritation if in direct contact with skin; be aware when you are to perform maintenance on or around this plant.



Michael Pascoe, NDP., ODH., CLT., MSc. (Plant Conservation)

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Family
Cupressaceae
Genus
Thuja
Species
occidentalis
Cultivar
'Golden Globe'
Category
Woody
Type
Shrub (evergreen)
Pronunciation
USDA Hardiness Zone
2 – 8
Canadian Hardiness Zone
0a - 8a
RHS Hardiness Zone
H4 - H7
Temperature (°C)
-48 - (-7)
Temperature (°F)
-50 - 20
Height
1 – 2 m
Spread
0.5 – 1.5 m
Photographs
Description and Growing Information
Flowering Period
General Description
A dense, multi-stemmed, dwarf, yellow-golden evergreen with uniform, broad, 'globe-like' growth.
Landscape
Looks great when used in the garden, as an accent plant, in hedges/screening, and as mass planting. With its dense, globe-shape growth habit, low maintenance and beautiful year round interest, this specific specimen is certainly an ideal plant to add value to a landscape.
Cultivation
Prefers full sun or partial shade as well as average to moist, well drained soil conditions with a 4.5-8 pH level. This specimen can not be left to dry out, but will not tolerate wet feet either. Golden Globe's new growth should be pruned in the early spring to reduce the incidence of leaf burn. After planted it would be beneficial to add a layer of mulch to promote good root growth. It is somewhat tolerant of urban pollution.
Shape
Dwarf, dense, multi-stemmed, naturally rounded form even without pruning.
Growth
Slow
ID Characteristic
Identified by its golden-yellow, dense, globe shaped form.
Pests
No serious diseases, although bagworms and spider mites may be found. Note that arborvitae plants are susceptible to tip blight.
Habitat
Horticultural origin.
Bark/Stem Description
The bark, although well hidden by the dense foliage, is a red-brown in colour.
Flower/Leaf Bud Description
Bright brown buds.
Leaf Description
Leathery, fine, scaled leaves. The foliage, as is the case with most arborvitae when crushed, may cause an allergic skin irritation in some individuals.
Colour Description
Features showy gold/green foliage all season, yellow/gold colour in spring, harvest gold colour in autumn. In winter bronze/honey orange colour imay be present.
Texture Description
A fine textured plant but with a medium-dense regular form.
Notable Specimens
Whistling Gardens, Wilsonville, Ontario, Canada.The Gardens of Fanshawe College (Conifer Garden), London, Ontario, Canada.
Propagation
Cuttings planted in well drained soil with bottom heat. Rooting time 60-150 days and it will take 1-2 years to produce a 3 litre plant.
References
Dirr, Micheal. Manual of Wood Landscape Plants. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing, 2009.
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