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Woody > Taxus > Taxus baccata > Taxus baccata

Taxus baccata


English Yew, Irish Yew




            Mike's Opinion

this is Mike

"

Not typically used in North American gardens but some cultivars are occasionally seen. A long lived, dark green, almost foreboding evergreen. One of the narrow-formed cultivars worth a try as an accent tree.



Michael Pascoe, NDP., ODH., CLT., MSc. (Plant Conservation)

"

Family
Taxaceae
Genus
Taxus
Species
baccata
Category
Woody
Type
Tree (evergreen)
Pronunciation
USDA Hardiness Zone
6b - 7a
Canadian Hardiness Zone
6b - 7
RHS Hardiness Zone
H6
Temperature (°C)
-21 - (-15)
Temperature (°F)
-5 - 5
Height
10 - 20 m
Spread
5 - 9 m
Photographs
Description and Growing Information
Flowering Period
March
General Description
Taxus baccata is an evergreen tree with thin, flaky, scaly and furrowed bark and dark green leaves with lustrous uppers. The best specimens are found in old English graveyards.
Cultivation
Prefers moist, well-drained, acidic soil with sand and loam. Grows well with other plants since it does not compete for nutrients. It has a strong fibrous root system which makes for easy transplanting.
Shape
The outline is pyramidal.
Growth
Slow
ID Characteristic
Dense branching with a broad, rounded or shrubby form. Foliage is dark green and bark is red-brown and furrowed. Needles are 1.25 - 2.5 cm long, usually spirally arranged.
Pests
Possible problems include: Taxus mealybug and/or scale, black vine weevil and yew-gall midge. Phytophora can be problematic in damp, mild conditions. In severe winter the foliage is prone to desiccation or 'winter burn'.
Bark/Stem Description
Uniquely reddish-brown, usually thin and furrowed. On mature plants the bark trunk often becomes scaly, flaky and fluted.
Leaf Description
Needles have a black-green upper and yellow-green underside, 1 - 2.5 cm long with curved margins and a prominent midrib. They are spirally arranged, spreading in erect shoots.
Flower Description
Dioecious: male strobili (cones) arise from leaf axils on the bottom of branchlets of the previous year's growth. Each branchlet consists of 6 - 14 stamens with short filaments.
Fruit Description
Fruit are olive-brown, about 5 mm long, usually biangular (rarely triangular or quadrangular). The seed-covering (arial) is red and rounded.
Texture Description
A fine to medium textured plant.
Notable Specimens
Westonbirt, The National Arboretum, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England.
Propagation
Usually propagated from cuttings because they root very easily. Seedlings are seldom propagated due to relatively slow growth.
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